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Ladies Night Real Full Monty

Over the last 2 nights, we’ve seen ‘The Real Full Monty’. Wednesday was the boys, raising awareness for Male Cancers, and last night was the girls turn, raising awareness for Women’s cancers. Both worthy causes, and if I’m honest, causes that aren’t explored enough.

I’ll be perfectly honest, nudity doesn’t bother me in the slightest. In fact, it bores me. We all have the same bits and pieces, they just come in different shapes and sizes, and apparently Colleen Nolan and Jeff Brazier certainly made up for most of the human race.

Sex Education is a broad subject, and it should be taught from cradle to grave. Not just the physical act, that’s a minor detail, as is making babies. Sex is everything from understanding the differences between guys and girls to menopause. Period pains to Male Teenage Aggression. A proper understanding of how our bodies work, and what can go wrong with them is imperative.

It’s also important to instil body confidence, but to also stress that no two bodies are the same. Jane has bigger boobs than Rachel. Billy is taller than Mark. Rhys wants to be called Rhea, and Lilly doesn’t like boys, she likes girls.

Can you imagine saying that to a 5 year old? Something so easy and simple to say, and understand, it’s almost a blasé comment, one that you would throw away without much afterthought. My nieces have never had an aunt and simple throw away comments made by my sister have made it normal. Obviously I’ve not told them about the joys of same sex relationships, or the physical side of it. But I have taught them that our relationship is no different to that of my sisters and her ex. We have bills, we bicker, we make up, we kiss.

So, why are we whitewashing our kids sex education? Sex is one of the fundamental cores of our very being. Why aren’t boys taught about periods? Why are girls not taught about prostates? Why is the human body so alien to the other gender? We all have hormones, we all have to go through puberty, we all experience good and bad relationships. Why are we not teaching the WHOLE subject? From bumpy boobs to bruised balls, we all at some point in our lives have a complaint about our intimate parts, why don’t we just normalize them? Maybe then, people would be more inclined to speak to their doctor or STI clinic.

Hypothetical scenario: ‘Doctor Frankenstein, my left breast is really tender and it’s drooping slightly more than usual.’. Instead, what do ladies do? They wear a higher support bra.

The same goes for men too. They could have a lump the size of a water melon on their testical, but they’ll do all they can to not disclose it, usually out of embarrassment.

Come on, it’s the human body, we all have one. Talk about it, and the possible issues we may have, that is the only way to get people to understand what’s normal, and if there’s something wrong.

 

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